Music by Josquin

Tu Pauperum Refugium
El Grillo

Collectio Musicorum Festival Chorus
Dr. Jeff S. Dailey, conductor



EARLY MUSIC FROM SCOTLAND Music from the 12th through the 18th centuries Featuring the American premieres of music by "the heretic priest" Robert Johnson Concert of October 18, 2019 Collectio Musicorum Dr. Jeff S. Dailey, Artistic Director Much of this program is devoted to music by Robert Johnson, a priest and reformer, who was forced to flee Scotland due to his reformed religious views. A prolific composer, his music has recently been edited by Dr. Elaine Moohan, Lecturer at the Open University of Scotland, as part of the Musica Scotica series. This music has never before been performed in the United States. Also among the pieces on the program are works from the twelfth century, when the northern portions of Scotland were under the control of Scandinavian kings, including one of the earliest examples of medieval polyphony, a hymn to St. Magnus the Martyr, who was martyred in 1115. Music by Mary, Queen of Scots, and her son, James VI, will also be heard, as well as music by Roderick Morison, also called “The Blind Harper,” who lived at the turn of the eighteenth century. Dun transsset sabbatum………………………………………Robert Johnson Killiekrankie……………………………………………………..Thomas O’Connellan Vir perfectis……………………………………………………...W1 Two Scottish bransles………………………………………….Thoinot Arbeau I give you a new commandment………………………………Robert Johnson Into a mirthful May morning……………………………………Anonymous Nobilis, humilis…………………………………………………..Anonymous Gypsies lilt……………………………………………………….Rowallan MS Defiled is my name……………………………………………...Robert Johnson O death, rock me asleep……………………………………….Anne Boleyn The beggar’s meal pokes………………………………………James VI Benedicam Domino………………………………………….....Robert Johnson Is eagal leam am bas…………………………………………...Roderick Morison How shall a young man?.......................................................Anonymous Scotch cap—Edinburgh Castle………………………………..John Playford O eternal God……………………………………………………Robert Johnson Cumha peathar ruaidhri………………………………………...Roderick Morison Ex te lux oritur……………………………………………………Anonymous I long for the wedding……..…………………………………….Straloch MS Deus miseratur nostri…………………………………………...Robert Johnson I long for thy virginitie..…………………………………………..Straloch MS Nou let us sing……………………………………………………Anonymous Collectio Musicorum Nate Adams, tenor Padraic Costello, countertenor Jeff S. Dailey (director), recorder, bass Christopher Morrongiello, lute Andrew Padgett, bass, percussion Christopher Preston Thompson, harp, tenor Amanda Sidebottom, soprano This concert was part of the New York Early Music Celebration--Ex Borealis

The Many Sounds of Rigoletto; the Music behind the Music

          In 1850, Giuseppe Verdi began composing an opera based on a contentious play that was banned in France.  Victor Hugo’s Le Roi S’amuse featured a licentious ruler who did whatever he wanted, including seducing women and killing their husbands, and who did so without worrying about any consequences. 
          But Verdi’s opera was not complete fiction.  The title character in Rigoletto was based on a real jester, Nicolas Ferrial, called Triboulet, who lived from 1479 to 1536.  The sumptuous Renaissance setting of the opera influenced the composer, as did music from that time period.
          Collectio Musicorum (“Collection of Music”) presents highlights from Verdi’s opera alongside music of earlier composers, including Tromboncino, Landini, Monteverdi, Attaingnant, Sermisy, Gonzaga, Jannequin, Rossi, and others who are less well known, including the single surviving piece by the mysterious French composer Abel. 
           This is a complete recording of the longest concert Collectio Musicorum ever gave.



Rigoletto Prelude….…Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901), arr. Antonio Melchiori (1827-1897)


La Guerre…………….……………………………….Clément Janequin (c.1485– 1558)



Pavane “La Rote de Rode” and Galliard…………….Pierre Attaingnant (c.1494-c.1552)



Minuet and Perigordino from Rigoletto……………………………Verdi, arr. Melchiori


Minuet from Don Giovanni…………………WA Mozart (1756-1791), arr. pub. c. 1809


Bienheureuse est la saison …………………………..Claudin de Sermisy (c. 1490-1562)


Dont vient cela…………………………..……………………………………….Sermisy


Estans assis aux rives acquactiques……….…………………………Abel (16th century)


Exalta regina Gallie………………….……………………..Jean Mouton (c. 1459-1522)


Radetzky March……………Johann Strauss, Senior (1804-1849), arr. A. Brunner 1892


Te Deum……………………………...…………Duke Guglielmo Gonzaga (1538-1587)


Pavana “La Favola d’Hercole” and Gagliarda “La Gamba”..anonymous Italian (16th century)


Lamento d’Arianna…………………………………….Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643)


Correnta terza detta la Cecchina…………………………..Salamone Rossi (c1570-1630)


Prelude and Waltzes from Act IV of Faust………………Giacomo Panizza (1804-1860)


“Zitti, zitti” from Rigoletto…………………….………………………………….Verdi


Per scriptores………………………………………………anonymous Italian (c.1500)


Io son de gabbia……………………………………...…..Michele Pesenti (c1470-1528)


Se la lumacha……………….………...………..Bartolomeo Tromboncino (1470-1535)


Passepied from Le Roi s’amuse ………......…………………..Léo Delibes (1836-1891)


“La rà, la rà, la rà” from Rigoletto……...…………………………Verdi, arr. Melchiori


Chanson antique from Le Roi s’amuse………...…………………………….. Delibes


Two ricercare from Regola Rubertina………..…………Silvestro Ganassi (1492-1565)


“La donna è mobile” from Rigoletto………………………………Verdi, arr. Melchiori


“Bella figlia dell’amore” from Rigoletto…………………………………………Verdi


Musica son………...………………………………….Francesco Landini (c.1325-1397)


Rigoletto Blues………René DeKnight (1913-2004); text George Botsford (1874-1949)

The encore is a chanson by Francois I


Elizabeth Bates, soprano
Andy Bhasin, violin
Philip Carter, violin, viola
Jeff S. Dailey, recorder, crumhorn, bass
Patrick Fennig, countertenor
Richard Lippold, baritone
Christopher Morrongiello, lute, mandolin
Kirsten Sollek, contralto
Arnie Tanimoto, viola da gamba, cello
Christopher Preston Thompson, tenor
Richard Walker, recorder, crumhorn, baritone
James Wetzel, piano

In this chanson, Pipelare combines a bawdy text with some very serious counterpoint. 

Waiting at the Church

Written in 1906 by composer Henry Pether, with words by Fred Leigh, this popular music hall tune was used by Eugene O'Neill in Ah! Wilderness.  Collectio Musicorum's performance features Amanda Sidebottom as the soloist, joined by the rest of the ensemble, and, at the end, the entire audience.  Unlike most recordings of this song, this one features all three verses.


Magister Piero (c1300-c1350) was one of the earliest of Italian Trecento composers.  This is a caccia with a bizarre text.

Pipelare--Virga Tua

Bicinium of verse from the 23rd Psalm by Piplelare.




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